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Features May 2004: Volume 1, Number 2
   

Carry On

 
     

Two intercontinental trips later, the ashes of former UCSD Philosophy Professor Herbert Marcuse were finally laid to rest in Dorotheenstadtischer Cemetry in Berlin in 2003.

As we reported in our January 2004 issue, Marcuse died of stroke while he was lecturing in Germany in 1979 but his ashes were not interred for another 24 years.

The serene garden-like cemetery is a far cry from the heady days of ’60s revolutionary fervor. Marcuse’s books One-Dimensional Man and Essay on Liberation critiqued the United States as possessing a “comfortable, smooth, reasonable, democratic unfreedom,” and inspired the student anti-war protests of the late ’60s. The Dorotheenstadtischer Cemetry, located in the former Jewish section of the city, is shaded by canopies of Linden trees and exudes a contemplative stillness. His plot is close to the graves of Heinrich Mann and the playwright Bertolt Brecht, and the simple headstone, just recently erected, reads “Weitermachen!”, which is translated as “Carry on!” It was the expression Marcuse used at the end of every class and seminar. “It’s the perfect epitaph for him,” says Professor Billy O’Brien (see "Provoking Thinkers" or page 16 of @UCSD).

“All his students warmly remember his ‘weitermachen!’”

 

 

RELATED LINKS

Herbert Marcuse Official Homepage
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Marcuse Quotations
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"Marcuse’s books critiqued the United States as possessing a “comfortable, smooth, reasonable, democratic unfreedom,” and inspired the student anti-war protests of the late ’60s."